Healthy Tips for Christmas

Healthy Tips for Christmas

Healthy Tips for ChristmasMaggie Ayre is the UKs leading Fitness Coach for Teen Girls. As well as one-to-one and small group nutrition and fitness sessions she has designed an online nutrition plan specifically for teens. She has also developed the 3G Program designed to be run at schools as part of the PE curriculum and she offers mentoring for PE departments on how to re-engage teen girls with PE. Maggie has recently published her third book; “Nutrition for Exam Success – A Parent’s Guide” which is now available as a Kindle and paperback at Amazon.

  1. Don’t eat too much!

It’s all too easy for Xmas to stretch from the day schools break up to the day kids return to school.  Limit your celebratory days to the traditional Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.

  1. Do something active every day…..

or allow yourself just Xmas Day off.  Walking, cycling, or jogging all count if your exercise class or sports club are closed.

3.Processed or salty food will make you feel sluggish.

Stick to fresh fruit and vegetables to keep your energy levels high.

4.Keep up your water intake. 

Over-indulging in tea, coffee, fizzy drinks and alcohol wont help your body work at its best.

5.Watch out for the alcohol. 

Many teens try alcohol for the first time over Xmas.  Make sure they know all the facts and drink sensibly.  You can’t make all their decisions for them but you can keep them informed.

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Family Communication

Family communication – communicate better over Christmas.

family communicationFamily communication can be a challenge at the best of time but over Christmas it can become very strained! So how do you make sure your family communication doesn’t suffer over the festive season? We asked family communication expert Lisa Warner for some tips.

Lisa Warner is a mum of four and a grandmother of two; she is an advocate of laid back parenting and believes that children need space to learn, play and make plenty of mistakes so they can develop resilience, confidence and self esteem. She is also the founder of Fink Cards and is passionate about helping children become confident communicators.

Family Communication – 10 Christmas communication tips.

1. Find time to talk.

Christmas can be a frantic and busy time and whilst you are running around trying to get 100 and 1 things done, remember to make time for regular family communication as it is the key to family harmony this Christmas.

2.   Have fun at the table.

If you are dreading family mealtimes this Christmas have fun at the table by downloading our free conversation cards or get the children to make some homemade question cards. Place these on each place setting and have some fun conversation at dinner.

3 . Family meeting.

Before all craziness begins take some time to have a family meeting, talk about your plans for Christmas, share out tasks and get everyone involved to share the work load.

4. What’s important to your family?

Do you look forward to some quiet family time at Christmas or is it about big parties? Do you enjoy travelling to see family or would you prefer to stay at home? To avoid arguments and disharmony this Christmas be clear on what’s important to your family.

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How to Get the Whole Family Involved in Christmas

whole family involved in ChristmasIt’s easy to get lost in the hustle and bustle of the holiday season. Between preparing elaborate feasts, adorning your home (both inside and out), setting up a Pinterest worthy Christmas tree, baking delectable holiday treats and carefully selecting the perfect presents for friends and family, keeping the season jolly can become a daunting task. But don’t let the seemingly endless list of to-dos cloud your sight on what truly matters this season: spending time with loved ones.

With a growing family it can be challenging to get your once enthused kids in the holiday spirit, but don’t give up hope. There are several ways to incorporate your whole family, including that sullen teenager, in your holiday festivities.

For Younger Children: Mail Call

Establish a sense of responsibility and contribution in younger children by tasking them with holiday card duty. Each day, have your child collect the mail and sort any holiday cards. As a family, you can view each card over dinner, with your youngest child initiating the card passing and then hanging them with care on your designated display. This will give your child a daily task to instill consistency and responsibility while encouraging excitement for the holiday season. It also will give you time to catch up with friends near and far via their holiday greetings.

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Parent teenager relationship – good news.

The good news is that teens do listen to parents about their future.

Parent teenager relationship not as bad as we thought!

parent teenager relastionhip Most parents I talk to think that their teens don’t listen to them, which may feel true in the moment. I absolutely know it isn’t true at all. So I get really excited when research backs up what I already know. NCS, an amazing company that provides an equally amazing programme for 16/17-year-olds found that 70% of teenagers do listen to their parents and seek advice when it comes to big decisions.  The decisions they are not likely to seek advice on are spending money, choice of university, A-Level subjects, university courses and their group of friends. So it is not all doom and gloom, our children really do listen to us. So it looks like the Parent teenager relationship is actually pretty string.

 So why do we worry about them so much? Parent teenager relationship means as much to them. 

Firstly, teens are not so great at looking like they are listening.  And often, we think that they aren’t listening when really they are. But from this research it appears that most parents worry about them so much because they perhaps didn’t take the advice themselves when they were young. 89% of parents say that they had regrets from their youth.

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Parenting Teenagers more difficult than a newborn.

6/10 Parents say parenting teenagers is more difficult than parenting newborns.

Parenting TeenagersAs UCAS deadlines loom and teenagers prepare to make decisions that could impact the rest of their lives, new research released today by National Citizen Service (NCS), the UK’s flagship youth programme, reveals parents are also feeling the pressure with six in ten admitting they worry more about their children as teenagers than they did as newborn babies. Essentially saying they feel parenting teenagers is more difficult than parenting newborns.

The research suggests parental anxiety is not fuelled by teenagers being disillusioned and disengaged as often portrayed. Many parents even admit their teen is more mature and more focused on their future than they were at that age, echoing previous research from NCS which named today’s teens as ‘Generation Citizen’. Instead, concerns are driven by parents’ regrets from their own youth – nine in ten have regrets from their adolescence  – and half agree that decisions made during their teenage years have impacted their life today. The study shows parents think they’d be wealthier, have a better job and be happier, if they had made better choices growing up. As teenagers prepare to submit UCAS applications in the New Year, parents are anxious about the decisions their teenager makes, feeling they have no influence over their child’s choices.

 

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